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Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own, so said Charles Dickens and, perhaps the brightest of those beauties is reserved for spring.

Spring, after all is nature’s reward for having slogged through the cold, dark months of winter. And there is no better place to experience its arrival than here in London when this city of parks and squares truly blossoms into life.

Just across the road from the InterContinental London Park Lane is Green Park, come spring the park turns bright yellow with a sea of daffodils. Interestingly, this is the only time when you will find flowers in the park, as there are no formal flower beds. According to rumour, Catherine of Braganza had all the flower beds removed after she caught her husband, King Charles II picking flowers for another woman. 

Also, nearby is the Buckingham Palace Memorial Gardens. Created in honour of Queen Victoria, the Memorial Garden is filled with 50,000 yellow wallflowers and red tulips, which takes ten staff around two weeks to plant.

Another must-visit at this time of year is the Isabella Plantation in Richmond Park, an area famous for its evergreen azaleas, imported from Japan in the 1920s, and which, during late April, erupt with pink flowers along the edges of the ponds and streams. 

What makes the visit even more special is the carpet of bluebells that are found amongst the trees. Just don’t be tempted to pick any, as they are now a protected species.

A secret garden, so secret that it is lost to most Londoners, is Camley Street Natural Park close to King’s Cross and St Pancras stations. This two-acre urban garden on the banks of the Regent’s Canal is the perfect place to watch heron fish in the water.

While you are there, a walk along the canal either towards Little Venice to the west, or Victoria Park to the east, offers a delightful chance to catch baby ducklings and cygnets taking to the water for the first time.

One final place that deserves a mention is the Hampstead Heath Pergola. Built in the 1900s and at around 240 metres long it is a stunning walk any time of the year, but come spring, when the wisteria is in bloom, it is simply breath-taking.