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There has probably never been a better description of the English Social Season than when Edward VII described the races at Goodwood in Sussex as "a garden party with racing tacked on", for The Season possibly has more to do with socialising than it has to do with sport. Either way, it is a delightful way to experience the quintessential British Summer.

Currently, the Season is in full-flow - there is much that has taken place and also to look forwards to.

The English Social Season came about as a way to keep the landed gentry entertained while Parliament was sitting. The upside of which means the most popular and impressive events tend to all be within easy reach of London.

Folklore has it that The Season begins in Spring at the Cheltenham Festival and ends on the 12th August, when historically individuals returned to their country seat, for the first day of grouse shooting. But for many, the starting pistol is shot at the Chelsea Flower Show.

Glyndebourne Festival is a series of opera concerts performed in the grounds of a grand English country estate. Here, tradition dictates that black tie and evening gowns be worn as you picnic on the lawns – regardless of the weather, in typical British fashion.

For horse racing, nothing quite beats the Derby in Epsom, Surrey. As this is the Queen’s favourite race meeting, not only does she regularly attend but she frequently enters one of her own horses into the race too.  Here you will find everyone resplendent in their summer finery, particularly in the Queen’s Stand, where silk top hats and ‘substantial fascinators’ are the order of the day.

For more eccentric headwear, Ladies’ Day at Ascot provides an abundance of varieties - where the millinery fashion stakes are raised considerably.

Further horse-centric activities, but this time with long-handled mallets, take place at the grounds of the Guards’ Polo Club in Windsor, where Polo’s most prestigious event, the Cartier Queen’s Cup is held.

Here, come half-time, guests should expect to join fellow spectators onto the field to participate in the grand polo tradition of "divot stamping": guests stomp down the mounds of earth (the divots) that have been torn up during play. It is also a fun tradition that also allows guests to socialise with others.

Finally, no list would be complete without a mention of the Henley Royal Regatta in Oxfordshire. Starting life as a carnival, the event gradually evolved into a rowing competition attended by the Royal Family.